How defining your message, kills it

I hope you’re doing great.
It’s been a while and I’m missing our interactions.
I’ve been busy but great, and you?
Please write back. I’d like to see you.

Much love,
Will

Compare to:

“I’m just writing to check up on you.
I hope you’re doing great.
It’s been a while and I’m missing our interactions.
I’ve been busy but great, and you?
Please write back. I’d like to see you.

Much love,
Will”

Did you feel the disappointment?  Did you feel the second one to be inauthentic? Fishy? Like there’s something behind it? Those are the ‘objections.’

Defining your message, kills it. The reasoning is simple. It’s embedded in biology not psychology (as Simon Sinek once put it.)

‘Defining’ appeals to the mind. Which in turn produces an average of 6 objections. Appealing to emotions on the other hand, does not produce objections.

That’s the difference between a less convincing long text that covers every objection, and a more effective short text that covers none. Think of long sales letters vs Apple ads.

Knowing how to do that is another story. But like all stories, it starts with trying and failing.

Yours,
Will

Twitter @williamchoukeir

Related how being careful when communicating is a bad thing, and what to do about it –COM103 or the destructive power of ‘but you don’t understand!’ and what to use instead? — COM102

 

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